Lisbon is Portugal's capital and is the western most capital in Europe and the hub of a multifaceted area that appealls to different tastes and sences, and also one the most charismatic and vibrant cities of western Europe.
As a holiday destination, Lisbon offers a rich and varied history, a social and friendly nightlife and is blessed with a glorious climate.
envolvente_gallery_01

25th of April Bridge


Also know as Bridge of Tagus, is the odest bridge across the tagus river in Lisbon. The more than 2 km long suspension bridge was inaugurated in 1966.
The suspension bridge is very similar in appearance to the Golden gate Bridge in San Francisco. It is 1.278 km long and leaves Lisbon at high level above Alcântara anda makes ladfall at Almada on the southern bank of the river.

Padrão dos Descobrimentos


The fifty meter (171ft) tall monument, shaped like a ship's, on the edge of the river. It is dedicated to the 15th to 16th century Age of Discovery when Portuguese explorers set out across the oceans who helped establish Portugal as a 14th century superpower.The monument depicts famous explorers and is shaped symbolically like the prow of a ship. It is made from rose colored stone with statues carved from limestone and shows more than thirty statues of people who played an important role in the discoveries. Leading the way is Henry the Navigator who is shown standing on the bow holding a model of a caravel. Behind him are king Afonso V - who supported the exploration and colonization of Africa - and the explorers Vasco da Gama (who found a direct route to India), Pedro Álvares Cabral (discoverer of Brazil) and Ferdinand Magellan (the first explorer to circumnavigate the world). They are followed by navigators, writers, missionaries, a mathematician, a cartographer and other figures from the era of the discoveries.

envolvente_gallery_02
envolvente_belem_01

Torre de Belém


The Torre de Belém (Belem Tower) is undoubtedly Lisbon's most iconic landmark. The tower was built in the sixteenth century in the Tagus river to control the entrance to the city from the sea. The idea to build a fortress near Belém was launched by king John II, who commissioned the construction of a tower in the river Tagus as part of a larger defensive bulwark. By the time plans for the tower were completed the king had died and the project was shelved. The project was revived in 1514, during the reign of his successor, king Manuel I. The tower was completed in 1521. At the time the tower was known as the Torre de São Vicente (Tower of St. Vincent).
The slow flow of the River Tejo combined with tectonic movements (such as the 1755 earthquake) have narrowed the mouth of the Tejo so that now the Tower of Belém lies on the edge of Belém's green parks. The tower is now easily accessible from the riverbank by a walkway that brings visitors right to the entrance.

Mosteiro dos Jerónimos


The Mosteiro dos Jerónimos is a highly ornate monastery that is situated in the Belém district of western Lisbon. This grand religious building was historically associated with the early sailors as explorers, as it was from here that Vasco da Gama spent his last night before his voyage to the Far East. This is a monastery of the military Order of Saint Jerome, it is an outstanding example of late-Gothic Manueline architecture. The monastery was constructed on the orders of King Manuel I near the site of an earlier 5th century church of Santa Maria de Belém. It was completed in 1601 and given to the Order of St. Jerome. The large monastery complex stands on the bank of the River Tagus. The structure has been an integral part of Portuguese history for the last five centuries.

envolvente_jeronimos_01
3093241296_e39e7ecbc5_o

Centro Cultural de Belém


Belém Cultural Center in Belém along the Tagus River, is the most important cultural of the capital and was originally built to host Portugal's presidency of the European Union in 1992. This multipurpose centre hosts concerts, performances, theatre productions, international conferences and prestigious exhibitions. It often presents world-class performances and has the city's largest auditorium for an excellent musical program and a museum of modern and Contemporary (museum Berardo), and has a terrace café on the first floor overlooking the river, as well as a shop.

Belém


Belém’s stands in front of the river Tejo. Ships set sail around the world, and many of the 14th century “voyages of discovery” departed from here. Their goal: Discove and control the sea routes of the highly lucrative spice trade. By the mid to late 16th century, the Portuguese Empire had become history’s first global empire. The result of the discovery of the sea route to India, the opening of trade with Japan, and the colonization of Brazil and parts of the coast of Africa and China.
The Portuguese maritime expansion history is now remembered through impressive monuments such as the Belém tower and the Jerónimos monastery. Both of them incorporate maritime and naturalist elements, in a reference to the Discoveries and Portugal's mythical destiny.

Belém


Belém’s stands in front of the river Tejo. Ships set sail around the world, and many of the 14th century “voyages of discovery” departed from here. Their goal: Discove and control the sea routes of the highly lucrative spice trade. By the mid to late 16th century, the Portuguese Empire had become history’s first global empire. The result of the discovery of the sea route to India, the opening of trade with Japan, and the colonization of Brazil and parts of the coast of Africa and China.
The Portuguese maritime expansion history is now remembered through impressive monuments such as the Belém tower and the Jerónimos monastery. Both of them incorporate maritime and naturalist elements, in a reference to the Discoveries and Portugal's mythical destiny.

Coaches Museum


One of Lisbon's most visited sights, the Coaches Museum (Museu Nacional dos Coches) has the largest and most valuable collection of its type in the world. It opened in 1905 in a richly-decorated 18th-century royal riding school that was part of Belem Palace, illustrating the ostentation and staggering wealth of the old Portuguese elite. On its 110th anniversary it moved across the street to a new building designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Paulo Mendes da Rocha. The new premises made it possible to also show accessories and carriages that weren’t previously shown.
Each carriage is more magnificent than the other, showing how artisans went to extraordinary lengths to make their vehicles stand out. One of the most outstanding has gilded figures on the tailgate showing Lisbon crowned by Fame and Abundance. Another one, used in an embassy to France's Louis XIV, depicts cherubs with bat's wings. Yet another splendid example was built in 1716 for Portugal's ambassador to Pope Clement XI, decorated with allegorical scenes representing Portuguese military and maritime triumphs. More wonderful examples belonged to several European royal families, from Spain to England, including a 19th-century coach built in London last used by Queen Elizabeth II on a state visit.
museu_dos_coches
Centro_de_Congressos_de_Lisboa

Lisbon Congress Centre


Located near the Tagus river near the historic buildings of Belém quarter, Lisboa Congress Centre is an inviting space for anyone wishing to hold congresses, conferences, meetings, exhibitions and other events. Three large entrance halls allow the holding of several and different kind of events simultaneously with maximum comfort and efficiency. The venue is served with up-to-date Audiovisual and IT Equipment and also Wi-Fi System.
In 1989, the Multi-purpose Pavilion, later known as the FIL Congress Centre and now called the Lisboa Congress Centre, was built. This pavilion, with four auditoria and five meeting rooms, used in combination with the other FIL pavilions, was a decisive factor in the sustained growth of business tourism in Lisbon and hosted the largest and most prestigious international events held in Portugal in the last 20 years. The growth in the Lisboa Congress Centre’s activities was particularly outstanding from 1995 onwards, going from 120 events in 1995, with a total of 55,000 participants, to 250 events in 1999, with 180,000 participants. It was a fundamental factor in making Lisboa one of the most popular destinations in the world for congresses and international conferences. When FIL moved to its new premises in Parque das Nações in 1999, it was possible to enlarge our available facilities. The Lisboa Congress Centre add another three pavilions with a total of 10,000m2 designed to host major events in excellent facilities and carry on the work of providing Lisboa with a large, modern congress centre, by remodelling and enlarging the existing premises.